catallaxy files

catallaxy in technical exile

Shuttle launch from space

with 20 comments

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Written by Admin

October 19, 2006 at 9:34 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

20 Responses

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  1. Obtained from a good friend of mine, not the MSM.

    skepticlawyer

    October 19, 2006 at 9:37 pm

  2. what do you mean “launch from space”? It’s looks to me as a launch from earth to space. Isn’t that right?

    jc

    October 19, 2006 at 10:16 pm

  3. The photo was taken from space. Obviously the launch is from earth 🙂

    skepticlawyer

    October 19, 2006 at 10:22 pm

  4. wow ptertty amazing. and the coast line, which you can see looks just so far away. I guess buying a ticket to get up there is worth it if you have the money.

    Next thing I’ve about is a space elevator.

    jc

    October 19, 2006 at 10:32 pm

  5. Truly awesome . And I mean that in the original sense of the word, not like a teenager describing his hot chips with tomato sauce.

    fatfingers

    October 20, 2006 at 12:18 am

  6. Maybe “shuttle launch, from space” que?

    Trying to figure out the reflection, is it back from a window?

    Whats the altitude of the pic, 30kms?

    Too many questions.

    rog

    October 20, 2006 at 6:59 am

  7. Now that’s the way to waste taxpayer’s money!

    Scott

    October 20, 2006 at 11:16 am

  8. Jason has already blogged on the privatisation of space travel, and how it need not have been taxpayer-funded. I can’t find the post just now (it may have gone with the server crash), but the idea is there.

    skepticlawyer

    October 20, 2006 at 12:15 pm

  9. One of the few truly wasteful enterprises still able to inspire even the most jaded.
    Do you know where the original is? I would like to get a high res version.

    Andrew Reynolds

    October 20, 2006 at 12:45 pm

  10. same here.
    Look, call me a philistine but if we must waste tax dollars I’d rather it were wasted on space exploration and particle accelerators than operas and arts grants.

    Even Ayn Rand wrote a piece raving about space exploration.

    Jason Soon

    October 20, 2006 at 12:50 pm

  11. http://www.aynrand.org/site/PageServer?pagename=objectivism_apollo11

    What we had seen, in naked essentials—but in reality, not in a work of art—was the concretized abstraction of man’s greatness.

    The fundamental significance of Apollo 11’s triumph is not political; it is philosophical; specifically, moral-epistemological.

    The meaning of the sight lay in the fact that when those dark red wings of fire flared open, one knew that one was not looking at a normal occurrence, but at a cataclysm which, if unleashed by nature, would have wiped man out of existence—and one knew also that this cataclysm was planned, unleashed, and controlled by man, that this unimaginable power was ruled by his power and, obediently serving his purpose, was making way for a slender, rising craft. One knew that this spectacle was not the product of inanimate nature, like some aurora borealis, or of chance, or of luck, that it was unmistakably human—with “human,” for once, meaning grandeur—that a purpose and a long, sustained, disciplined effort had gone to achieve this series of moments, and that man was succeeding, succeeding, succeeding! For once, if only for seven minutes, the worst among those who saw it had to feel—not “How small is man by the side of the Grand Canyon!”—but “How great is man and how safe is nature when he conquers it!”

    Jason Soon

    October 20, 2006 at 12:52 pm

  12. Andrew, I have a high-res version of this and another shot. Email me privately and I’ll send you both.

    skepticlawyer

    October 20, 2006 at 12:55 pm

  13. Sorry, sl – where can I get your address?

    Andrew Reynolds

    October 20, 2006 at 1:10 pm

  14. I’ll leave a post on your blog.

    skepticlawyer

    October 20, 2006 at 1:13 pm

  15. Depending on how you count it, it is either a $60 million or $1.3 billion picture.

    I don’t have a problem with government spending on space research, but the shuttle and ISS programs are massive wastes of money. Robotic tools such as Spirit and Opportunity have provided orders of magnitude more value at a fraction of the costs.

    Or as James Van Allen put it:

    My position is that it is high time for a calm debate on more fundamental questions. Does human spaceflight continue to serve a compelling cultural purpose and/or our national interest? Or does human spaceflight simply have a life of its own, without a realistic objective that is remotely commensurate with its costs? Or, indeed, is human spaceflight now obsolete?

    and

    Almost all of the space program’s important advances in scientific knowledge have been accomplished by hundreds of robotic spacecraft in orbit about Earth and on missions to the distant planets Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune,” van Allen writes. Similarly, robotic exploration of comets and asteroids “has truly revolutionized our knowledge of the solar system

    From http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/vanallen_spaceflight_040726.html

    Ken Miles

    October 20, 2006 at 1:32 pm

  16. sure Ken, don’t have a problem with that. Robots should be used for space exploration at this stage but if we can make space tourists pay their own way that would be great too.

    Jason Soon

    October 20, 2006 at 1:34 pm

  17. no we can’t have space tourists. Think of all the co2 emitted from such a vane and greedy excercise. We need to keep the earth free of C02.

    jc

    October 20, 2006 at 1:49 pm

  18. just admit it, JC, you miss the Munnchkin don’t you?

    Jason Soon

    October 20, 2006 at 1:54 pm

  19. Yea
    Where is the rodent?
    You can always tell when I start missing him. I start to sound like our resdient self described Gaia lover. Munnchkin, where are you? I have to confess I used my V8 double exhaust twice this week, so please don’t bawl me out.

    jc

    October 20, 2006 at 2:06 pm

  20. sure Ken, don’t have a problem with that. Robots should be used for space exploration at this stage but if we can make space tourists pay their own way that would be great too.

    Certainly there is nothing wrong with using space tourists to recover a few tens of millions of dollars out of approx. one billion which we are going to spend, but when the robots take over, there won’t be any room for them.

    Guess they will have to go with the sub-orbital flight option.

    More seriously, I’m not convinced that manned flight will be useful in any sort of scientific space program in the future, simply because robots don’t need to breath or return home.

    Ken Miles

    October 20, 2006 at 5:20 pm


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